Nietzsche head

This life-sized bust of Nietzsche is a com-
missioned work of art from a Berlin museum.

Seattle Nietzsche Reading Group

The Group has recently finished a run through of all of Nietzsche's primary texts and we are currently on an extended break. I am reassessing the group's mission and purpose at this time. I have had several inquiries from people who want to join and am considering starting a new group. Nietzsche's works, obviously, deserve many readings.

Where: Office of Donovan R. Bigelow, J.D., LL.M., M.A., LMHC
  The Pioneer Building
  600 First Avenue, Suite 524
  Seattle, Washington 98104
 
Contact: Phone: (206) 940-6732
  Email: donovanbigelow@aol.com
  Web: www.donovanbigelow.com
 
Fee: $25.00 per session


Friedrich Nietzsche: Untimely Psychologist

Friedrich Nietzsche is the most important philosopher since Plato and has set the course of philosophy and psychology in new directions that will endure for a 1000-years. He understood himself to be �untimely.� During his lifetime no one seemed to understand what he was trying to do. His failure to be understood was a constant disappointment for him. He did have hopes that future generations might be better placed to appreciate his style and his ideas. In September of 1886 while on a short vacation he wrote a letter to a friend,

� I�ve recently sent you a book. Its title is Beyond Good and Evil: Prelude to a Philosophy of the Future. (Forgive me! It isn�t that you�re supposed to read it, much less give me your opinion of it. People will dare read it, I suppose, some time around the year 2000.)

We are, apparently, somewhat behind schedule.

We read Nietzsche as he wanted his most worthy readers to read him: slowly and carefully, a few pages at a time, and with an eye towards their place in Nietzsche�s continuous development and their immediate relevance to our lives today, and to the future of us all.

It is my intention to work through all of his texts, returning to and re-reading those that seem most important. By the time we finish the complete works, it will be necessary to start over. We will be ready to go deeper and higher.

He saw himself as the “First Psychologist” and with poetic intensity opened the door to the unconscious for Freud and the first generation of psychoanalysts. Freud said of him, “The degree of introspection achieved by Nietzsche had never been achieved by anyone, nor is it likely ever to be reached again.” High praise, indeed, from the founder of Psychoanalysis.

Memorabilia

I have acquired some significant Nietzsche memorabilia including a unique life-sized bust from a Berlin museum and an engraved cane given to him by Cosima Wagner. The items include a pair of his glasses, a razor strop, an engraved inkwell, and a pen. Most were acquired through the Antiquitaetshaus Schmitt & Herzog who provided Echtheitszertificaten (Certificates of Authenticity) It is my hope that having these articles, surrounded by his works and a library of secondary literature, and being overseen by the bust will inspire the Nietzsche Reading Group to go higher, deeper, and farther into the future.

How to Apply

Limited chairs are available by application only. Anyone with a serious interest and a meaningful familiarity with Nietzsche is welcome to apply. I am interested in attracting the widest variety of perspectives on Nietzsche. He would expect nothing less. He expected worthy readers to be able to find their own meaning in his work and wrote to confound the unworthy. It is not surprising then that over the last 100 years of Nietzsche scholarship there has been little agreement on what he meant in any of his books. He wrote primarily in aphorisms that were at once creative, literary, harshly critical, and always evocative. As a psychotherapist it seems to me that his writings may fairly be described as a giant projective test: your interpretation of Nietzsche says more about you than it does about Nietzsche. His purpose was to induce self-overcoming and cultural renewal. We are really quite behind schedule so come join us.

Please send an email message or letter of interest to:

Donovan R. Bigelow, J.D., LL.M., M.A., LMHC
The Pioneer Building
600 First Avenue , Suite 524
Seattle, Washington 98104
email: donovanbigelow@aol.com

Donovan Bigelow

I am a Licensed Mental Health Counselor (LMHC) in private psychotherapy practice in the Pioneer Square area of Seattle, Washington. My clinical focus is on adolescent, adult, and couples therapy. For more information, please visit my website.

Nietzsche Resources

North American Nietzsche Society

Richard Schacht (NANS)
Department of Philosophy
105 Gregory Hall
University of Illinois
810 South Wright Street
Urbana, Illinois 61801
217-333-1939
www.phil.uiuc.edu/nietzsche/
NANS assistant: Nathalie Morasch: nans@uiuc.edu

Friedrich Nietzsche Society

Dr. Greg Moore, FNS Secretary
Department of German
University of St. Andrews
St. Andrews, KY169PH
United Kingdom
www.fns.org.uk/index.htm
Duncan Large (d.a.g.large@swan.ac.uk)

Nietzsche Society

Prof. Babette E. Babich
Executive Secretary, Nietzsche Society
Department of Philosophy
Fordham University
113 West 60th Street
New York, NY 10023
www.fordham.edu/gsas/phil/new_nietzsche_society.html
Babich@fordham.edu

Nietzsche Circle

P.O. Box 575
New York, NY 10011
www.nietzschecircle.com/
info@nietzschecircle.com

Additional web resources on Nietzsche:

Works by Friedrich Nietzsche at Project Gutenberg
Wikipedia - Friedrich Nietzsche
Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy - Friedrich Nietzsche

Introduction to Nietzsche

The ideas and methods of Friedrich Nietzsche are the ideas and methods of modern thought. His is, arguably, the first philosophical voice of modernity: the first to truly face the world without presupposition, the first to question everything that we have believed and that has enabled us to live for millennia. God, truth, "the good," morality, equality, democracy, reason itself: all are cast before the cold - or not so cold - eye of his scrutiny and none emerges the same � some must die, some must humble themselves, some must run in fright - but none escapes examination. Nietzsche revolutionized both the lexicon and the style of philosophical thought. As magnificent as the writing of the Pre-Socratics, of Plato, of the philosophes, of Hume, Kant, Hegel and Schopenhauer can be, nothing prepared the world for the writing of Nietzsche; and no one preceded him in opening up the scope of philosophical inquiry to the entire range of human experience. In the eyes of Freud, he is the first psychoanalyst; he thematized the primacy of language long before Saussure and Wittgenstein; the idea of "perspective," which revolutionized the study of man, is his; he created the method of immanent critique. The man who "philosophized with a hammer," who exhorted the "free spirits of Europe" to "smash the old tables of value," who wrote the obituary of God, has in some way himself, expectedly if against his will, been raised onto a pedestal, as is the way with all real greatness in the hands of helpless acolytes. For "a people is but a detour of nature to produce five or six men... and then, yes, to get beyond them as well." Nietzsche's work has the impact of an injudiciously opened fire door - perhaps the door to hell itself. And one is easily lost among the hundreds of rhetorically magnificent experiments in thought which Nietzsche has outlined - almost any one of them is enough to deeply shake the world of any one of us. To find firm ground is the work of a lifetime, but perhaps a misguided effort. Even as one begins to locate the inklings of structure in his work, the work itself undermines them.

One hundred years after his death, and in spite of world fame on an order that must strike any fastidious reader as absurd, Nietzsche's is still a voice in the wilderness. Soren Kierkegaard dedicated his works, perhaps not all that hopefully, to "the one;" Nietzsche's most famous book Also Sprach Zarathustra is subtitled, "A Book for Everyone and No One." With his preternatural insight into the human psyche, Nietzsche recognized that, in some fundamental way, regardless of how many might encounter his thought, his insights and discoveries were his alone, and that the way of the disciple can never ultimately be the way of the thinker. As he said, "He but poorly repays his teacher who always remains a pupil."

And yet the fact remains that Nietzsche's effect on western history and culture has been profound, astonishingly widespread and enduring. It would be impossible to identify another thinker who has so fundamentally altering the outlook of intellectual possibility for a new age - and there was perhaps no more delightful prospect to Nietzsche than to maximize human possibility. Instead of a coterie of timid magistri preening in the cloak of the master - of the sort left by other seminal thinkers like Kant or Hegel - Nietzsche revealed unsuspected paths for the likes of the greatest creative spirits of modern times, artists and philosophers like Mann, Wittgenstein, Husserl, Heidegger, Musil, Hesse, Camus, Mahler, Di Chirico, Sartre, Kafka, Rilke, Freud, Unamuno, Eeo Strauss, Bataille, Bely, Shestov, Foucault, German Expressionism, Italian Futurism, the New York School and dozens of others, distressingly including Rosenberg, Goebbels and Ayn Rand. Recent scholarship has even credited the influence of Nietzsche with a significant part in both the Russian Revolution of 1917 and the eventual, and gradual, "counter-revolution" that toppled that system. For anyone who takes the Nietzschean philosophy seriously, the vast range of his influences, and the even vaster applicability of his thought, must be a source of real disquiet. At the same time, it suggests that Nietzsche sounds the depth of the human spirit � any human spirit. One can find in Nietzsche what it had never before been possible to find in a thinker: oneself. (And this, of course, means "kicking away the ladder," to borrow a phrase from Wittgenstein.)

One often wonders, fresh from a session in Nietzsche's world, how the bigger world can continue on as if nothing had happened, when all of its idols have been smashed and all of its prejudices exposed. The fact is that it does not, that it has changed, and it has changed profoundly - but that Nietzsche cannot be the support for a systemic change. The questionable beliefs and laws and compromises by which we live are, for all that, necessary - not in detail, but in the structure of social life. What has changed is within some of us, and perhaps eventually social consequences beyond the creations of some individual spirits ensue. We are a world profoundly different from the world in which Hegel lived; whether Nietzsche merely gave voice to an inevitable Zeitgeist - magnificent an achievement as that might be - or wrenched the very viscera of a world whose self-satisfaction was the seed of its decay, remains an open question. Nonetheless, the idea itself of an open question came into being only in the work of Nietzsche.

By permission of the author: John Wronoski

Nietzsche Bibliography

The bibliography below represents 25 years of study and exploration. I am particularly interested in the convergence of Nietzsche, psychoanalysis, and the pre-Socratic praxis of philosophy. Suggestions concerning important texts that I am missing will always be greatly appreciated. This bibliography, of course, is a work of becoming never to be seen as an achievement.

Collections of Nietzsche�s Works: English Editions

Cambridge Texts in the History of Philosophy:

Untimely Meditations, ed. Daniel Breazeale, trans. R. J. Hollingdale (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1997).

Human, All Too Human, intro. Richard Schacht, trans. R. J. Hollingdale (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1996).

Daybreak: Thoughts on the Prejudices of Morality, ed. Maudemarie Clark and Brian Leiter, trans. R. J. Hollingdale (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1997).

Basic Writings of Nietzsche, ed. and trans. Walter Kaufmann (New York: Modern Library, 1992).

The Complete Works of Friedrich Nietzsche, ed. Oscar Levy, 18 vols (Edinburgh and London: Foulis, 1909-13).

The Complete Works of Friedrich Nietzsche, ed. Ernst Behler and Bernd Magnus, vols. 2 and 3 of 20 to be published (Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 1995--).

The Portable Nietzsche, ed. and trans. Walter Kaufmann (New York: Viking, 1954).

Nietzsche�s Individual Works/Notes: English Editions

The Pre-Platonic Philosophers, trans. Greg Whitlock (Urbana and Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2001).

Philosophy and Truth: Selections from Nietzsche�s Notebooks of the Early 1870s, ed. and trans. Daniel Breazeale (Atlantic Highlands, NJ: Humanities Press, 1979).

Philosophy in the Tragic Age of the Greeks, trans. Marianne Cowan (Chicago: Regnery, 1991).

Prefaces to Unwritten Works, trans. and ed. Michael W. Grenke (South Bend, Indiana: St. Augustine�s Press, 2005).

The Gay Science: With a Prelude of Rhymes and an Appendix of Songs, trans. Walter Kaufmann (New York: Vintage Books, 1974).

Thus Spoke Zarathustra: A Book for Everyone and No One, trans. R. J. Hollingdale (New York and London: Penguin Books, 1969).

Thus Spoke Zarathustra: A Book for Everyone and No One, trans. Walter Kaufmann (New York: The Modern Library, 1995).

Beyond Good and Evil: Prelude to a Philosophy of the Future, trans. Walter Kaufmann (New York: Vintage Books, 1989).

Genealogy of Morals & Ecce Homo, trans. Walter Kaufmann & R. J. Hollingdale (New York: Vintage Books,1989).

Twilight of the Idols and the Anti-Christ, trans. R. J. Hollingdale (London: Penguin Books, 1990).

The Will to Power, ed. Walter Kaufmann, trans. Walter Kaufmann and R. J. Hollingdale (New York: Random House, 1967).

Dithyrams of Dionysus, bilingual edition, trans. R. J. Hollingdale (London: Anvil Press Poetry Ltd, 2001).

[My Sister and I (forgery)]

Nietzsche�s Works: German Editions

Baumler, Alfred, Friedrich Nietzsche Werke, vols 1-6 (Leipzig: Alfred Kroner Velag, 1930).

Samtliche Briefe: Kritische Studienausgabe, ed. Giorgio Coli and Mazzino Montinari, 8 vols (Berlin and New York: de Gruyter, 1986).

Samtliche Werke: Kritische Studienausgabe, ed. Giorgio Coli and Mazzino Montinari, 15 vols (Berlin and New York: de Gruyter, 1988).

Schlechta, Karl, Friedrich Nietzsche � Werke, vol. V (Frankfort/M und Berlin: Ullstein Materialien, 1965).

Nietzsche�s Letters in English

Nietzsche: A Self-Portrait From His Letters, eds. and trans. Peter Fuss and Henry Shapiro (Cambridge, Massachusetts: Harvard University Press, 1971).

Nietzsche: Unpublished Letters, ed. and trans. Kurt Leidecker (New York: Philosophical Library, 1959).

Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche, ed. And trans. Christopher Middleton (Chicago and London: University of Chicago Press, 1969).

The Nietzsche � Wagner Correspondence, ed. Elizabeth Foerster-Nietzsche, trans. Caroline V. Kerr, Intro. H , L. Mencken, (New York: Liveright, 1949).

Secondary Works on Nietzsche in English:

Abraham, Gerald, Nietzsche (London: Duckworth, 1933).

Ackermann, Robert John, Nietzsche: A Frenzied Look (Amherst and London: University of Massachusetts Press, 1990).

Ahern, Daniel, R., Nietzsche as Cultural Physician (University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 1995).

Alderman, Harold, Nietzsche�s Gift (Athens: Ohio University Press, 1977).

Allison, David B. (ed.), The New Nietzsche: Contemporary Styles of Interpretation, 2nd edn (Cambridge, MA AND London: MIT Press, 1985).

______ Reading the New Nietzsche (Lanham, MD and Oxford: Rowman & Littlefield, 2001).

Andreas-Salome, Lou, Nietzsche, trans. Siegfried Mandell (Redding Ridge, CT: Black Swan Books, 1988).

______, Looking Back: Memoirs (New York: Paragon House, 1991).

______, Sigmund Freud and Lou Andreas-Salome Letters, ed. Ernst Pfeiffer, trans. William and Elaine Robson-Scott (New York: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, Inc., 1966).

______, The Freud Journal of Lou andreas-Salome, trans. Stanley A. Leavy (New York: Basic Books, 1964).

Ansell-Pearson, Keith, An Introduction to Nietzsche as Political Thinker: The Perfect Nihilist (New York: Cambridge University Press, 1974).

______, Nietzsche Contra Rousseau: A Study of Nietzsche�s Moral and Political Thought (New York: Cambridge University Press, 1996).

______, Viroid Life: Perspectives on Nietzsche and the Transhuman Condition (London and New York: Routledge, 1997).

Appel, Frederick, Nietzsche Contra Democracy (Ithaca, NY and London: Cornell University Press, 1999.

Ascheim, Steven E., The Nietzsche Legacy in Germany, 1890-1990 (Berkeley, Los Angeles, and London: University of California Press, 1992).

Assoun, Paul-Laurent, Freud and Nietzsche (London, Continuum, 2000).

Babich, Babette, E., Nietzsche�s Philosophy of Science: Reflecting Science on the Ground of Art and Life (Albany: State University of New York Press, 1994.

Barker, Stephen, Auto-Aesthetics: Strategies of the Self after Nietzsche (New Jersey and London: Humanities Press, 1992).

Bataille, Georges, On Nietzsche, trans. Bruce Boone (London: Althone Press, 1992).

Belliotti, Raymond Angelo, Stalking Nietzsche (Westport, Connecticut: Greenwood Press, 1998).

Bergmann, Peter, Nietzsche: �The Last Antipolitical German� (Bloomington and Indianapolis: Indiana University Press, 1987).

Berkowitz, Peter, Nietzsche: The Ethics of an Immoralist (Cambridge, MA and London: Harvard University Press, 1995).

Binion, Rudolph, Frau Lou: Nietzsche�s Wayward Disciple (Princeton, New Jersey: Princeton University Press, 1968).

Bishop, Paul, The Dionysian Self: C. G. Jung�s Receptions of Friedrich Nietzsche (Berlin and New York: de Gruyter, 1995).

Blondel, Eirc, Nietzsche: The Body and Culture: Philosophy as a Philological Genealogy (London: Athlone Press, 1991).

Brandes, George, Friedrich Nietzsche (New York and London: The Macmillan Company, 1889).

Brinton, Crane, Nietzsche (New York: Harper & Row, Publishers, 1965).

Burgard, Peter, J. (ed.), Nietzsche and the Feminine (Charlottesville and London: University Press of Virginia, 1994).

Carus, Paul, Nietzsche and Other Exponents of Individualism (Chicago and London: The Open Court Publishing Company, 1914).

Cate, Curtis, Friedrich Nietzsche (London: Hutchinson, 2002).

Chamberlain, Lesley, Nietzsche in Turin: An Intimate Biography (New York: Picador, 1996).

Chapelle, Daniel, Nietzsche and Psychoanalysis (Albany: State University of New York Press, 1993).

Chessick, Richard D. A Brief Introduction to the Genius of Nietzsche (New York: University Press of America, 1983).

Clark, Maudemarie, Nietzsche on Truth and Philosophy (Cambridge and new York: Cambridge University Press, 1990.

Clive, Geoffrey, The Philosophy of Nietzsche (New York: Meridian, 1996).

Conway, Daniel W., Nietzsche�s Dangerous Game: Philosophy in the Twilight of the Idols Cambridge and New York: Cambridge University Press, 1977).

______ Nietzsche and the Political (London and New York: Routledge, 1997).

Cooper, David E., Authenticity and Learning: Nietzsche�s Educational Philosophy (London and Boston: Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1983).

Crawford, Claudia, To Nietzsche: Dionysus, I Love You! Ariadne (Albany: State University of New York Press, 1995).

Danto, Arthur, Nietzsche as Philosopher : An Original Study (New York: Columbia University Press, 1980).

Del Caro, Adrian, Nietzsche Contra Nietzsche: Creativity and the Anti-Romantic (Baton Rouge and London: Louisiana State University Press, 1983).

Del Caro, Adrian, Dionysian Aesthetics: The Role of Destruction in Creation as Reflected in the Life and Works of Friedrich Nietzsche (Frankfort am Main: Peter Lang, 1981).

Deleuze, Gilles, Nietzsche and Philosophy, trans. Hugh Tomlinson (London: Althone Press, 1983).

Derrida, Jacques, Spurs: Nietzsche�s Styles, trans. Barbara Harlow (Chicago and London: University of Chicago Press, 1979).

Detwiler, Bruce, Nietzsche and the Politics of Aristocratic Radicalism (Chicago and London: University of Chicago Press, 1990).

Diethe, Carol, Nietzsche�s Women: Beyond the Whip (Berlin and New York: de Gruyter, 1996).

Dixon, Patricia, Nietzsche and Jung: Sailing a Deeper Night (New York: Lang, 1999).

Donadio, Stephen, Nietzsche, Henry James, and the Artistic Will (New York and Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1978).

Elsner, Gary, Nietzsche: A Philosophical Biography (Lanham, Maryland: University Press of America, (1992).

Faguet, Emile, On Reading Nietzsche, trans. George Raffalovich (New York: Moffat, Yard and Company, 1918).

Ferry, Luc, and Alain Renaut (eds.) Why We are Not Nietzscheans, trans. Robert de Loaiza (Chicago and London: University of Chicago Press, 1997).

Fischer-Dieskau, Dietrich, Wagner and Nietzsche, trans. Joachim Neugroschel (New York: Seasbury Press, 1976).

Foster, John Burt, Jr., Heirs to Dionysus: A Nietzschean Current in Literary Modernism (Princeton, NJ and Guildford: Princeton University Press, 1981).

Frenzel, Ivo, Friedrich Nietzsche: An Illustrated Biography (New York: Pegasus, 1967).

Frey-Rohn, Liliane, Friedrich Nietzsche: A Psychological Approach to His Life and Work (Einsiedeln, Switzerland: Daimon Verlag, 1989).

Gillespie, Michael Allen and Tracy B. Strong (eds) Nietzsche�s New Seas: Explorations in Philosophy, Aesthetics, and Politics (Chicago and London: University of Chicago Press, 1988.

_______ Nihilism Before Nietzsche (Chicago and London: The University of Chicago Press, 1995).

Gilman, Sander L. (ed.), Conversations with Nietzsche: A Life in the Words of His Contemporaries, trans. David J. Parent (New York and Oxford: Oxford University Press 1987).

Golomb, Jacob, Nietzsche�s Enticing Psychology of Power (Ames: Iowa State University Press, 1989).

______ Weaver Sataniello, and Ronald L. Lehrer (eds), Nietzsche and Depth Psychology (Albany: State University of New York Press, 1999).

______ Nietzsche and Jewish Culture (London and New York: Routledge, 1997).

Gooding-Williams, Robert, Zarathustra�s Dionysian Modernism (Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 2001).

Graybeal, Jean, Language and �the Feminine� in Nietzsche and Heidegger (Bloomington and Indianapolis: Indiana University Press, 1990.

Grimm, Rudiger H., Nietzsche�s Theory of Knowledge (Berlin and New York: de Gruyter, 1977).

Grundlehner, Philip, The Poetry of Friedrich Nietzsche (New York: and Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1986).

Haar, Michel, Nietzsche and Metaphysics, trans. Michael Gendre (Albany: State University of New York Press, 1996).

Hadot, Pierre, Philosophy as a Way of Life (Malden, MA and Oxford: Blackwell Publishing, 1995).

Hales, Steven D., and Rex Welshon, Nietzsche�s Perspectivism (Urbana and Chicago: University of Illinois Press, 2000).

Halevy, Daniel, The Life of Nietzsche, trans. J. M. Hone (New York: theMacmillan Company, 1911).

Hans, James S., The Question of Value: Thinking Through Nietzsche, Heidegger, and Freud (Carbondale and Edwardsville: Southern Illinois University Press, 1989).

Hatab, Lawrence, J., A Nietzschean Defense of Democracy: An Experiment in Postmodern Politics (Chicago and La Salle, IL: Open Court, 1995.

Havas, Randall, Nietzsche�s Genealogy: Nihilism and the Will to Knowledge (Ithaca, NY and London: Cornell University Press, 1995).

Hayman, Ronald, Nietzsche: A Critical Life (New York: Oxford University Press 1980).

Heidegger, Martin, Nietzsche, ed. David Farrell Krell, trans. David Farrell Krell et al., 4 vols (San Francisco and London: Harper & Row, 1979-87).

Heilke, Thomas, Nietzsche�s Tragic Regime: Culture, Aesthetics, and Political Education (DeKalb: Northern Illinois University Press, 1998).

Heller, Eric, The Importance of Nietzsche: Ten Essays (Chicago and London: University of Chicago Press, 1988).

Higgens, Kathleen Marie, Comic Relief: Nietzsche�s �Gay Science� (New York and Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1986).

Hollingdale, R. J., Nietzsche: The Man and His Philosophy (Baton Rouge: Louisana State University Press, 1965).

_______, Nietzsche (London and Boston: Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1973).

_______, A Nietzsche Reader (New York and London: Penguin Books, 1977).

Hoover, A. J., Friedrich Nietzsche: His Life and Thought (Westport, Connecticut: Praeger, 1994).

Hough, Sheridan, Nietzsche�s Noontide Friend: The Self as Metaphoric Double (University Park, Pennsylvania: The Pennsylvania State University Press, 1997).

Huben, William Dostoevsky, Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, and Kafka: Four Prophets of our Destiny (New York: Collier Books, 1962).

Hunt, Lester H., Nietzsche and the Origin of Virtue (London and New York: Routledge, 1991).

Huskinson, Lucy, Nietzsche and Jung � The Whole Self in the Union of Opposites, (New York: Brunner-Routledge, 2004).

Hutter, Horst, Shaping the Future: Nietzsche's New Regime of the Soul and Its Ascetic Practices (New York and Oxford: Lexington Books, 2006).

Irigaray, Luce, Marine Lover of Friedrich Nietzsche, trans. Gillian C. Gill (New York: Columbia University Press, 1991).

Jaspers, Karl, Nietzsche: An Introduction to the Understanding of his Philosophical Activity, trans. Charles F. Wallraff and Frederick J. Schmitz (Chicago: Regnery; Tucson: University of Arizona Press 1965).

Jung, C. G., Jung�s Seminar on Nietzsche�s �Zarathustra,� ed. James L. Jarrett (Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 1997).

Jurist, Elliot L., Beyond Hegel and Nietzsche: Philosophy, Culture, and Agency (London: The MIT Press, 2000).

Kaufmann, Walter, Nietzsche's Theory of Values (Thesis submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for a Ph.D. in Philosophy. Harvard University, March 1947).

Kaufmann, Walter, Nietzsche: Philosopher, Psychologist, Anti-Christ, 4th edn (Princeton, NJ and London: Princeton University Press 1974).

Kemal, Salim, Ivan Gaskell, and Daniel W. Conway (eds), Nietzsche, Philosophy, and the Arts (Cambridge and New York: Cambridge University Press, 1998).

Klein, Wayne, Nietzsche and the Promise of Philosophy (Albany: State University of New York Press, 1997).

Klossowski, Pierre, Nietzsche and the Vicious Circle, trans. Daniel W. Smith (London: Althlone Press, 1997).

Kofman, Sarah, Nietzsche and Metaphor, trans. Duncan Large (London: Althone Press, 1993).

Kohler, Joachim, Zarathustra�s Secret: The Interior Life of Friedrich Nietzsche, trans. Ronald Taylor (New Haven, CT and London: Yale University Press, 2002).

______ Nietzsche and Wagner: A Lesson in Subjugation, trans. Ronald Taylor (New Haven, CT and London: Yale University Press, 1998).

Kostka, Alexandre and Irving Wohlfarth, Nietzsche and an Architecture of our Minds (Los Angeles, California: Getty Research Institute for the History of Art and the Humanities, 1999).

Krell, David Farrell, Infectious Nietzsche (Bloomington and Indianapolis: Indiana University Press, 1996).

____ and Donald L. Bates, The Good European: Nietzsche�s Work Sites in Word and Image (Chicago and London: University of Chicago Press, 1997).

____ and David Wood (eds), Exceedingly Nietzsche: Aspects of Contemporary Nietzsche-Interpretation (London and New York: Routledge, 1988).

_____, Nietzsche � A Novel (New York: State University of New York Press, 1996).

Lampert, Laurence, Nietzsche�s Teaching: An Interpretation of �Thus Spoke Zarathustra,� New Haven, CT and London: Yale University Press, 1986).

______ Nietzsche and Modern Times: A Study of Bacon, Descartes, and Nietzsche (New Haven, CY and London: Yale University Press, 1993).

______ Leo Strauss and Nietzsche (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1996).

______ Nietzsche�s Task: An Interpretation of �Beyond Good and Evil� (New Haven, CT and London: Yale University Press, 2001).

Lavrin, Janko, Nietzsche: A Biographical Introduction (New York: Charles Scribner�s Sons, 1971).

Lea, F. A., The Tragic Philosopher: A Study of Friedrich Nietzsche (London and Atlantic Highlands, NJ: Athlone Press, 1993).

Lehrer, Ronald, Nietzsche�s Presence in Freud�s Life and Thought: On the Origins of a Psychology of Dynamic Unconscious Mental Functioning (Albany: State University of New York Press, 1995).

Leiter, Brian, Nietzsche on Morality, (New York: Routledge, 2002).

Levine, Peter, Nietzsche and the Modern Crisis of the Humanities (New York: State University Press of New York, 1995).

Livingstone, Angela, Salome: Her Life and Work (Mt. Kisco, New York: Moyer Bell Limited, 1984).

Lomax, J. Harvey, The Paradox of Philosophical Education: Nietzsche�s New Nobility and the Eternal Recurrence in Beyond Good and Evil (New York: Lexington Books, 2003).

Love, Frederick R., Young Nietzsche and the Wagnerian Experience (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1963).

______ Nietzsche�s Saint Peter: Genesis and Cultivation of an Illusion (Berlin and New York: de Gruyter, 1981).

Love, Nancy, Marx, Nietzsche, and Modernity (New York and Guildford: Columbia University Press, 1986).

Lowith, Karl, From Hegel to Nietzsche: The Revolution in Nineteenth�Century Thought, trans. David E. Gree (New York: Holt, Rinehart & Winston, 1964).

______ Nietzsche�s Philosophy of the Eternal Recurrence of the Same, trans. J. Harvey Lomax (Berkley, Los Angeles, and London: University of California Press, 1997.

MacIntyre, Alex, The Forgotten Fatherland: The Search for Elisabeth Nietzsche (London: Macmillan, 1992).

Magnus, Bernd and Kathleen M. Higgins (eds.) The Cambridge Companion to Nietzsche (Cambridge and New York: Cambridge University Press, 1988).

Magnus, Bernd, Stanley Stewart and Jean-Pierre Mileur, Nietzsche�s Case: Philosophy as/and Literature (New York and London: Routledge, 1993).

Mahon, Michael, Foucault�s Nietzschean Genealogy: Truth, Power, and the Subject (Albany: State University of New York Press, 1992).

Mandel, Siegfried, Nietzsche and the Jews: Exaltation and Denigration (Amherst, NY: Prometheus Books, 1998).

Mann, Heinrich, Heinrich Mann Presents the Living Thoughts of Nietzsche (London and Toronto: Cassell and Company, Limited, 1946).

May, Kieth, Nietzsche and the Spirit of Tragedy (Basingstoke: Macmillan: New York: St. Martin�s Press, 1990).

Mencken, H. L., Friedrich Nietzsche (New Brunswick and London: Transaction Publishers, 1993).

Metcalf, Stephen, Hammer of the Gods (London: Creation Books, 1995).

Miklowitz, Pul S., Metaphysics to Metafictions: Hegel, Nietzsche, and the End of Philosophy (Albany: State University of New York Press, 1998).

Milton, Colin, Lawrence and Nietzsche: A Study in Influence (Aberdeen, U.K.: The University Press, 1987).

Mistry, Freny, Nietzsche and Buddhism: Prolegomenon to a Comparative Study (Berlin and New York: de Gruyter, 1981).

Moles, Alistair, Nietzsche�s Philosophy of Nature and Cosmology (New York: Lang, 1990).

Montinari, Mazzino, Reading Nietzsche, trans. Greg Whitlock (Urbana and Chicago: University of Illinois Press, 2003).

Morgan, George Allen, Jr., What Nietzsche Means Cabridge, Massachusetts: Harvard University Press, 19410.

Morrison, Robert G., Nietzsche and Buddhism: A Study in Nihilism and Ironic Affinities Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press, 1997).

Muller-Lauter, Wolfgang, Nietzsche: His Philosophy of Contradictions and the Contradictions of His Philosophy, trans. David J. Parent (Urbana and Chicago: University of Illinois Press, 1999).

Murphy, Tim, Nietzsche, Metaphor, Religion (Albany: State University of New York Press, 2001).

Nehamas, Alexander, Nietzsche: Life as Literature (Cambridge, MA and London: Harvard University Press, 1985).

Novack, Philip, The Vision of Nietzsche (Rockport, Massachusetts: Element, 1996).

O�Hara, Daniel T. (ed.), Why Nietzsche Now? (Bloomington and Indianapolis: Indiana University Press, 1985).

Oliver, Kelly, Womanizing Nietzsche: Philosophy�s Relations to the �Feminine� New York and London: Routledge, 1995).

______ and Marilyn Pearsall (eds.), Feminist Interpretations of Friedrich Nietzsche (University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 1998).

Oppel, Frances Nesbitt, Nietzsche on Gender: Beyond Man and Woman (Charlottesville and London: University of Virginia Press, 2005).

Ormiston, Gayle L and Alan D. Schrift, Transforming the Hermeneutic Context: From Nietzsche to Nancy (Albany: State University of New York Press, 1990).

______, The Hermeneutic Tradition � From Ast to Ricoeur (Albany: Statue University of New York Press, 1990).

Owen, David, Nietzsche, Politics, and Modernity: A Critique of Liberal Reason (London, Thousand Oaks, CA and New Delhi: Sage, 1995).

_____ Maturity and Modernity: Nietzsche, Weber, Foucault and the Ambivalence of Reason (London and New York: Routledge, 1994).

Parkes, Graham (ed.), Nietzsche and Asian Thought (Chicago and London: University of Chicago Press, 1991).

_____ Composing the Soul: Reaches of Nietzsche�s Psychology (Chicago and London: University of Chicago Press, 1994).

Patton, Paul (ed.) Nietzsche, Feminism, and Political Theory (London and New York: Routledge, 1993).

Pavur, Claude, Nietzsche: Humanist (Milwaukee: Marquette University Press, 1998).

Pearson, Keith Ansell and Duncan Large, The Nietzsche Reader (Malden, MA and London: Blackwell Publishing, Ltd.. 2006).

Peters, H. F., Zarathustra�s Sister: The Case of Elisabeth and Friedrich Nietzsche (New York: Crown, 1977).

Picart, Caroline Joan S., Resentment and the �Feminine� in Nietzsche�s Politico-Aesthetics (University Park: Pennslyvania State University Press, 1999).

Pletsch, Carl, Young Nietzsche: Becoming a Genius (New York: Free Press, 1991).

Podach, E. F., The Madness of Nietzsche (London and New York: Putnam, 1931).

Poellner, Peter, Nietzsche and Metaphysics (New York: Oxford University Press, 1995.

Porter, James I., Nietzsche and the Philology of the Future (Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 2000.

______ The Invention of Dionysus: An Essay on the Birth of Tragedy (Stanford, California: Stanford University Press, 2000).

Reginster, Bernard, The Affirmation of Life: Nietzsche on Overcoming Nihilism (Cambridge, Massachusetts and London: Harvard University Press, 2006).

Reyburn, H. A., Nietzsche: The Story of a Human Philosopher (London: Macmillan & Co. Ltd, 1948).

Richardson, John, Nietzsche�s System (New York and Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1996).

Rickels, Laurence A. (ed.), Looking After Nietzsche (Albany: Statue University of New York Press, 1990).

Ridley, Aaron, Nietzsche�s Conscience: Six Character Studies for the �Genealogy,� (Ithaca, NY & and London: Cornell University Press, 1998).

Roberts, Tyler, T., Contesting Spirits: Nietzsche, Affirmation, Religion (Princeton, NJ and Chichester: Princeton University Press, 1998).

Robinson, Dave, Nietzsche and Postmodernism (Reading, UK: Cox & Wyman Ltd, 1999).

Rosen, Stanley, The Mask of Enlightenment: Nietzsche�s �Zarathustra,� Cambridge and New York: Cambridge University Press 1995).

Safranski, Rudiger, Nietzsche: A Philosophical Biography, trans. Shelley Frisch (New York: Norton, 2002).

Sallis, John, Crossings: Nietzsche and the Space of Tragedy (Chicago and London: University of Chicago Press, 1991).

Santaniello, Weaver, Nietzsche, God, and the Jews: His Critique of Judeo-Christianity in Relation to the Nazi Myth (Albany: State University of New York Press, 1994).

Schaberg, William H., The Nietzsche Canon: A Publication History and Bibliography (Chicago and London: University of Chicago Press).

Schacht, Richard, Nietzsche (London and Boston: Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1983).

_______, Nietzsche, Genealogy, and Morality: Esaays on Nietzsche�s �Genealogy of Morals (Berkeley, Los Angeles and London: University of California Press, 1994).

________, Making Sense of Nietzsche: Reflections Timely and Untimely (Urbana and Chicago: University of Illinois Press, 1995).

Schrift, Alan D. (ed.), Why Nietzsche Still? Reflections of Drama, Culture, and Politics (Berkley, Los Angeles, and London: University of California Press, 2000).

______ Nietzsche and the Question of Interpretation: Between Hermeneutics and Deconstruction (New York and London: Routledge, 1990).

______ Nietzsche�s French Legacy: A Genealogy of Poststructuralism (New York and London: Routledge, 1995).

Schutte, Ofelia, Beyond Nihilism: Nietzsche Without Masks (Chicago and London: University of Chicago Press, 1984).

Shapiro, Gary, Nietzschean Narratives (Bloomington and Indianapolis: Indiana University Press, 1989).

Silk, M. S. and J. P. Stern, Nietzsche on Tragedy (Cambridge and New York: Cambridge University Press, 1981).

Simmel, Georg, Schopenhauer and Nietzsche, trans. Helmut Loisk and, Deena Weinstein, and Michael Weinstein (Amherst: University of Massachusetts Press, 1986.

Sleines, E. E., Nietzsche�s Revaluation of Values: A Study in Strategies (Urbana and Chicago: University of Illinois Press, 1994).

Sloterdijk, Peter, Thinker On Stage: Nietzsche�s Materialism, trans. Jamie Owen Daniel (Minneapolis: university of Minnesota Press, 1989).

Solomon, Robert C., Living With Nietzsche: What the Great �Immoralist� Has to Teach Us (Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press, 2003.

Smith, Gregory Bruce, Nietzsche, Heidegger, and the Transition to Post-Modernity (Chicago and London: The University of Chicago Press, 1996).

Solomon, Robert C. and Kathleen M. Higgens, What Nietzsche Really Said (New York: Schocken Books, 2000).

Stack, George, J., Nietzsche and Emerson: An Elective Affinity (Athens: Ohio University Press, 1992).

Stambaugh, Joan, The Other Nietzsche (Albany: State University of New York Press, 1994).

Staten, Henry, Nietzsche�s Voice (Ithaca, NY and London: Cornell University Press, 1990).

Steinbuch, Thomas, A Commentary on Nietzsche�s �Ecce Homo� (Lanham, MD and London: University Press of America, 1994).

Stern, J. P., Nietzsche (London: Fontana Press, 1978).

Strong, Tracy B., Friedrich Nietzsche and the Politics of Transfiguration- Expanded Edition (Urbana and Chicago: University of Illinois Press, 1978).

Tanner, Michael, Nietzsche (Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press 1974).

Tejera, Victorino, Nietzsche and Greek Thought (Dordrecht: Nijhoff, 1987).

Thatcher, David, S., Nietzsche in England, 1890-1914: The Growth of a Reputation (Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 1970).

Thiele, Leslie Paul, Friedrich Nietzsche and the Politics of the Soul: A Study in Heroic Individualism (Princeton, NJ and London: Princeton University Press, 1990).

Thomas, Douglas, Reading Nietzsche Rhetorically (New York and London: Guilford Press, 1999).

Tuttle, Howard, N., The Crowd is Untruth: The Existential Critique of Mass Society in the Thought of Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, Heidegger, and Ortega y Gasset (New York; Peter Lang, 1996).

Van Tongeren, Paul J. M., Reinterpreting Modern Culture: An Introduction to Friedrich Nietzsche�s Philosophy (West Lafayette, IN: Purdue University Press 2000).

Waite, Geoff, Nietzsche�s Corps/e: Aesthetics, Politics, or The Spectacular Technoculture of Everyday Life (Durham, NC and London: Duke University Press, 1996).

Warren, Mark, Nietzsche and Political Thought (Cambridge, MA and London: MIT Press, 1988).

White, Alan, Within Nietzsche�s Labyrinth (New York and London: Routledge, 1990).

______ Nietzsche and the Problem of Sovereignty (Urbana and Chicago: University of Illinois Press, 1997).

Wilcox, John T., Truth and Value in Nietzsche: A Study of His Metaethics and Epistemology (Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 1974).

Williams, Linda, L., Nietzsche�s Mirror: The World as Will to Power (Lanham, MD and Oxford: Rowman & Littlefield, 2000).

Winchester, James J., Nietzsche�s Aesthetic Turn: Reading Nietzsche after Heidegger, Deleuze, and Derrida (Albany: State University of New York Press, 1994).

Wolfenstein, Eugene Victor, Inside/Outside Nietzsche: Psychoanalytic Explorations (Ithaca and London: Cornell University Press, 2000).

Yalum, Irvin D., When Nietzsche Wept: A Novel of Obsession (New York: Basic Books, 1992).

Young, Julian, Nietzsche�s Philosophy of Art (Cambridge and New York: Cambridge University Press, 1992).

Zeitlin, Irving, M., Nietzsche: A Re-Examination (Cambridge, MA: Blackwell Publishers, 1994).

Zupancic, Alenka, The Shortest Shadow: Nietzsche�s Philosophy of the Two (Cambridge, MA and London: MIT Press, 2003).

Secondary Works on Nietzsche in German

Gasser, Reinhard, Nietzsche und Freud, (Berlin and New York: Walter de Gruyter, 1997).

Janz, Curt Paul, Friedrich Nietzsche Biographie, vols. 1-3 (Munchen und Vien: Carl Hanser Verlag, 1978).

Ross, Werner, Lou Andreas-Salome: Weggefahrtin von Nietzsche, Rilke, Freud (Berlin: Wolf Jobst Siedler GmbH, 1992).

Miscellaneous

Kaufmann, Walter, Nietzsche�s Theory of Values (Thesis submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for a Ph.D. in Philosophy. Harvard University, March 1947).